Reveal your true salaries, Labour tells Bainimarama/Khaiyum

  • 5th July 2014
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“Moreover, for a political party
to amass assets of some $636,000
within just days of its formation
under the very restrictive funding provisions in the political parties decree,
raises a number of very
serious questions
.

The Fiji Labour Party  calls on Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama and Attorney General Aiyaz Khaiyum to disclose the actual salaries paid to them from April 2010 to date and to reveal the name(s) of those through whom the payments were made.

“The salaries declared by them in the Fiji Sun of 4 July are not what they were getting paid in the last four years. The amounts disclosed have been substantially reduced from what both were actually paid from April 2010,” said Labour Leader Mahendra Chaudhry.

We have repeatedly alleged that the prime minister and the attorney general were paid around $1million each through the private accounting firm owned by Dr. Nur Bano Ali who is the Attorney General’s aunt. We have also said that the arrangement was made clandestinely and was not acceptable government practice.

“To this day our allegations have not been refuted by the two who have chosen to remain silent,” Mr Chaudhry said.

We now call on the Permanent Secretary for Finance to clear the air to establish the truth. If he does not respond by providing the required details as in the past when called to do so, then it will be assumed that our allegations are true.

It is the Permanent Secretary’s duty to divulge the truth to the people, in view of the attempt by the prime minister and the attorney general to evade the issue,” Mr Chaudhry said.

The assets disclosed by the Fiji First Party to the Registrar of Political Parties as published in the newspaper also raises questions about the party’s funding sources which have not been published as required under s16(2) of the Political Parties Decree.

Moreover, for a political party to amass assets of some $636,000 within just days of its formation under the very restrictive funding provisions in the political parties decree, raises a number of very serious questions.

We call on the Registrar to publish the sources of funds as required by law so that the people can get to know just who is funding the prime minister’s party.

Another matter requiring explanation from the Registrar is why have the disclosures been published in such miniscule print so as to make it extremely difficult for the reader to make out the figures and words in the statement.

“It seems this was done deliberately to discourage people from reading or analyzing the good financial health of the newly formed Fiji First Party,” said Mr Chaudhry.